We need to modernise sex and relationship education

Over the course of the last year the media rediscovered its fascination with feminism- a movement that is now going through its fourth wave. An unprecedented amount of articles tracking the progress women have made towards achieving genuine gender equality was published this International Women’s Day. The statistics they contained demonstrate why feminism is still very much needed in modern society. One in three women worldwide will be beaten or sexually abused in their lifetime. Two women a week are killed by an intimate partner in the UK, and only 1% of the world’s property is owned by women.




Anonymity in cases of sexual abuse

With the current focus on Maria Miller’s expenses fiddling, it is easy to forget that MPs and other public figures are often tied up in scandal. The most recent example is that of the former deputy speaker Nigel Evans MP, who was recently cleared of charges of sexual abuse. The acquittal of Nigel Evans, hot on the heels of actors Bill Roache and Michael Le Vell, makes now an appropriate time to review how the UK legal system deals with cases of sexual abuse and rape.  


The low road to socialism

The Labour Party is losing the fight to save the welfare state. In railing against coalition cuts, Labour seeks to paint itself as a warrior against injustice, protecting the most vulnerable in society. However by assuming the role of valiant defender for the poor, the party risks undermining the very institutions it is looking protect. Put simply it’s time for Labour to bury the moral crusade and get on with politics.


Campaigning with the Young Fabians

On the weekend of March 22, I had my first experience of door-to-door campaigning for the local government elections. We were supporting John Howard, an excellent local council candidate in Aldborough Ward, Redbridge. Winning a council seat for John at this year’s local elections would be a first step towards winning back the crucial marginal constituency, Ilford North, in 2015. At present the Conservatives have a 5,000 strong majority here. 


My first time campaigning

Last Saturday saw the Young Fabians begin in earnest our campaigns programme, as we headed to Ilford North for some canvassing on behalf of Wes Streeting, the Labour candidate. For some of us, including myself, this was effectively an introduction to canvassing and an opportunity to experience the kind of door to door campaigning that is so crucial in winning votes and seats.




Majority Rules

Labour are in trouble. The wave of post-Budget polls spelled bad news for the party, revealing its lead over the Conservatives to have tumbled to a single percentage point from a high of nine in early March.  


How to save Europe's lost generation

The next edition of Anticipations focuses on the Labour Party's relationship with the European Union, and explores the challenges and opportunities it faces in the run-up to the parliamentary elections in May and beyond. Young Fabians Member Oliver MacArthur asks what more Europe could do to end the scourge of youth unemployment.


Labour's case for the European Union

The next edition of Anticipations focuses on the Labour Party's relationship with the European Union, and explores the challenges and opportunities it faces in the run-up to the parliamentary elections in May and beyond. London Labour MEP candidate Lucy Anderson lays out what's at stake when Europe next casts its vote.   


UKIP is no party of the working class

Received wisdom maintains that the UKIP vote is made up of disaffected, older Tories who are dissatisfied with Cameron’s socially liberal policies and relatively progressive stance on Europe. But look closer and you will see this is simply not the case. While UKIP does disproportionately draw support from Tory voters, polling has shown they can also boast substantial support from working-class Labour voters too.


What can we learn from Generation Share?

The UK is in the midst of a housing crisis with demand dramatically outstripping supply. According to the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, “Britain is heading for a property shortage of more than a million homes by 2022 unless the current rate of housebuilding is dramatically increased”.


Generation why Labour?

Fabian leaflet 43 begins: “Vote! Vote!! Vote!!!” Its rallying cry against apathy reminds voters of the sacrifice of their forbears to win the franchise and asks them to “use what cost so much to win”. More than 100 years on and its message is no less important. Indeed, it has a renewed resonance at a time when political apathy, particularly amongst young people, seems to have become the norm.


Blogging tips

This is a guestpost by Scarlet Standard blogger Emma Burnell as follow up to our writing workshop in February 

Why I started blogging

I felt that I had something to say that was missing from the debate. I wanted to be helpful and offer my advice and expertise to the Labour Party but no one was banging down my door. Because I am a little bit gobby, I decided to create my own space and hope something came of doing so.


My top 10 tips for writing and pitching

The following is a guestpost by Left Foot Forward Editor James Bloodworth as follow up to the Young Fabian writing workshop in February

My top 10 tips for writing and pitching:

1) Find out the name of the person you want to pitch to. Not ‘Dear Editor’ or ‘To Whom it May Concern’. Emails which begin like that will (and should be) deleted.



SRI pension schemes: a behemoth force for good?

Once the sole domain of providers like the Co-Op, over the past decade, the concept of socially responsible investing (SRI) has come to the fore as investors of all sizes consider the ethical credentials of their portfolios. It then begs the question, what level of SRI do we want in our own pension funds, which for many are their only contact with the equities market? Can we afford the ‘luxury’ of meeting minimum ethical standards when we face an upcoming pensions crisis, or should the primary concern be yield at any cost to prevent the next generation living in poverty? Moreover, as stewards of what is effectively large sums of public money (although not in the literal sense) do the largest pension schemes have an implicit duty to bring about positive change?


Labour must focus on the lowest paid as well as the highest paid on tax reform

The fierce debate around Ed Balls’ pledge to reintroduce the 50p tax rate is set to rage all the way up to the 2015 general election. Few policy announcements could match it for symbolic resonance among the party faithful, or- as recent polling indicates- the wider public. The tax rise sends out a clear message about Labour’s priority in government: ensuring those with the deepest pockets contribute most to restoring the public finances.